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PAST EVENTS (September 2015-April 2016)

11th April, 18.00
Palazzo Pesaro Papafava, Cannaregio 3764, 30121 Venezia

‘John Ruskin, Tintoretto and the Scuola Grande di San Rocco’
A lecture by Clive Wilmer to the Circolo Italo-Britannico (Venice).

* * *

Millennium Gallery, Sheffield
7th March, 1pm-1.45pm

Guild Companion Dr Marcus Waithe talks about Ruskin's contribution to the theory of craftsmanship, and the practical contribution he made in Sheffield by founding St George's Museum in Walkley. Free, just turn up.

Millennium Gallery, Sheffield
29th February, 1pm-1.45pm

Guild director Rachel Dickinson is a lively, engaging speaker who will use writings by Ruskin and objects from the In the Making exhibition to show how good craftsmanship in clothes making can help create a more beautiful, fairer society. Free, just turn up.

27th February - 17th Apri 2016
3rd John Ruskin Prize exhibition
Recording Britain Now: Society

New Art Gallery, Walsall [venue website]

Private View: Thursday, 25th February
An exhibition of the artists' work shortlisted for the 2015 John Ruskin Prize.

Details to follow.

Shortlist Announced (December 2015)

Companions will remember that the Big Draw/Campaign for Drawing originated in an initiative of the Guild of St George. It is now a thriving independent charity with a global reach. In 2012, the Guild and the Campaign joined forces to hold an art competition, the John Ruskin Prize. We are delighted to inform you that the winning shortlist of 30 artists competing in the third Prize (Recording Britain Now: Society) has now been announced. You can read all about it - and view examples of the artwork - online.

London Ashridge Circle
Wednesday, February 17

JOHN RUSKIN’S ST GEORGE
A lecture by Clive Wilmer, Master, The Guild of St George

Details of the Club can be found here.

20th December 2015
12.30pm-1.30pm

Clive Wilmer, Reading Nature in Architecture:
A Student of John Ruskin looks at the
Swedenborgian Church, San Francisco

Swedenborgian Church, San Francisco

Clive Wilmer is a poet who has been reading the work of John Ruskin for nearly 50 years. Like Ruskin, he has been drawn all his life to sacred buildings – from the stone circle at Avebury in Wiltshire to Chartres Cathedral. He recently spoke on Ruskin, who inspired the Arts and Crafts movement all over the world, at the Swedenborgian Church, and would like (after morning service there) to reflect upon the experience in Ruskinian terms.

19 Dec. 7.30.
First Church of Christ Scientist

Nicholas Friend and Clive Wilmer:
News from Nowhere. A Dialogue about William Morris’s Utopian Novel

In 1890, in the throes of the industrial revolution, William Morris described for the world his uplifting dream of what civilization might become—the friend, rather than the enemy, of nature, fraternity, cultural heritage, and worthy and pleasurable labour. It was a vision to inspire social reform movements and communities rooted in utopian ideals, including Berkeley’s own Hillside Club.

You can read more about on Tim Holton's blog.

18th December 2015
7pm-8pm
Clive Wilmer,
Ruskin in Modern Poems: A Reading and a Commentary
Swedenborgian Church, San Francisco

Clive Wilmer is a poet who has been reading the work of John Ruskin for nearly 50 years. He thinks that the great Victorian has much to say to modern people, both here and in Europe, on a great many subjects. In particular, sees Ruskin’s prose as an important influence on modern poetry, including the poems he writes himself. On this occasion, he will read and talk about passages from Ruskin’s work and poems by some of the poets affected by it – Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, Geoffrey Hill and other poets, including himself.

On 17th December, Companion Nicholas Friend will address the Hillside Club, Berkeley, California, giving a talk entitled, The HillSide Club and the True Meaning of Civilizabetion.

The Hillside Club emerged as a powerful force when clearminded women and influential men joined together to challenge profound social, philosophical, geopolitical and economic forces unleashed by the Industrial Revolution. Speaking with a distinct voice in Berkeley's earliest years, the Hillside Club members insisted there be a mutually beneficial relationship between Berkeley’s unique geographic setting and the human activities practiced therein. Their collective intelligence and determination guided the formation of a university town unique in the world yet deeply connected over time, land and oceans with other communities in Britain, Europe, and Scandinavia.

Landscape, architecture and society are intimately woven together in the story of Berkeley’s emergence as a place at one with the eternal spirit of its location on the hills above the San Francisco Bay, its rugged oaks and creeks, and the promise afforded by its views of Mount Tamalpais and the Golden Gate. The Hillside Club responded to threats to the genius loci by drawing on the collective wisdom of its European antecedents. The lecture begins with an exploration of the Hillside Club’s ancestry in Bishop Berkeley’s Bermuda project, Samuel Coleridge’s Pantisocracy, Robert Owen’s New Lanark and New Harmony, Titus Salt’s Saltaire, John Ruskin’s Guild of St George, and William Morris’s Firm. Friend will investigate how Samuel and Henrietta Barnett's Toynbee Hall, Jonathan Carr’s Bedford Park, Ebenezer Howard’s plans for Letchworth, Octavia Hill’s National Trust, and the Hillside Club were made possible by their example. The talk will conclude with an appreciation of the Hillside Club’s role in establishing Berkeley as a fair and revitalizing environment for its citizens, both civilized and civilizing, a role surely as topical today as it was then.

International Conference
CULTURAL HERITAGE. SCENARIOS 2015
Venice, 26-28 November 2015

FRIDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2015,
SCOLETTA DI SAN ROCCO, SAN POLO 3052 (14.45-18.30)
Session III: Cultural heritage compacts
Chair: Prof. P. Clemente, Università di Firenze

Keynote speaker:
Clive Wilmer, Master of the Guild of St George:
At the source of an evergreen lesson on cultural heritage: Ruskin meets Tintoretto at San Rocco


The next AGM of the Guild will be held on Saturday, 7 November, at the Arundel Room, Millennium Gallery, Sheffield. Full details here.

The Guild's fourth symposium, which will revisit the subject of Ruskin and Economics, is due to take place on Saturday, 24th October 2015 at Mary Ward House, Bloomsbury.

Click above for the full symposium flier.

The organisational work is being led by the ethical investment firm ShareAction, with assistance from the Guild, and is overseen by Guild Companion and ShareAction head Catherine Howarth and Guild Director Chris Harris.

The day will consist of lectures and a choice of workshops. The emphasis will be on how Ruskin’s ideas can be implemented in the 21st century.

Further details to follow... RSVP to events@shareaction.org

The Doheny Library, University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles:
8pm, 3 September 2015

Ruskin's Language: How a Victorian Prophet Uses Words
A lecture to the Ruskin Art Club, Los Angeles, by Clive Wilmer

As a boy John Ruskin wanted to be a poet. He abandoned that ambition early on, but continued to use language much as a poet does. His prose is not merely expository; it is also contemplative. It examines the complex meanings of words, explores etymologies, builds clusters of imagery, and generates literary symbols. It was through these essentially poetic methods that Ruskin succeeded in binding together the range and variety of his interests, creating a unified vision of art, nature and society.

Swedenborgian Church, San Francisco: 10 September 2015, 6.30pm
'Beautiful, peaceful and fruitful': John Ruskin's Guild of St George
A lecture by Clive Wilmer. with Companion Aonghus Gordon.

John Ruskin (1819-1900) was a polymath: art critic, social critic, economist, naturalist, artist and philanthropist. He has even been credited with foreseeing climate change, which suggests something essential about his thought. He was a conservationist, in the built as well as the natural environment, and in 1871 he set up a utopian body, the Guild of St George, with the aim of restoring the links between art and craft, social wealth and natural abundance.

[Note. As the repeated synopsis implies, this lecture will be based on that at USC on 2nd September. The lectures will not be identical, however, and in this second lecture there will be more attention to the Guild than in the first. Conversely, the earlier lecture will have more to say about Ruskin as environmentalist prophet.]

Colophon Club, Berkeley: 8 September 2015, 8pm
John Ruskin, William Morris and the Revival of Craftsmanship
A lecture by Clive Wilmer

John Ruskin’s art criticism is also social criticism. His books The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) and The Stones of Venice (1851-53) shifted the focus of art history and criticism from abstract ideals of beauty to quality of workmanship and of work itself. This emphasis on craft and labour gave direction to the life and career of William Morris as designer, craftsman and design entrepreneur, and through Morris it generated the Arts and Craft Movement. (This lecture will end with some discussion of the Kelmscott Press.)

The William Morris Society at 60

To Celebrate the Diamond Jubilee Year of the William Morris Society we are hosting a Symposium on the 5th September 2015 at the Birmingham and Midland Institute titled Morris in the 21st Century. The featured speakers are: Jan Marsh, Chair (National Portrait Gallery and President, WMS), Ruth Levitas (University of Bristol), Tony Pinkney (University of Lancaster), Patrick O’Sullivan, Owen Holland (University of Cambridge), David Mabb (Goldsmiths, University of London). Ticket and further information can be found on our website http://williammorrissociety.org or by contacting the office at Kelmscott House – admin@williammorrissociety.org.uk

Other events are taking place between now and December – for details see http://williammorrissociety.org/category/events/

BEYOND BAROQUE Literary Arts Center, Los Angeles
4 September 2015 8pm

Clive Wilmer reads from his New and Collected Poems

Wilmer is a poet and lecturer from England. Since 2009 he has been Master of the Guild of St George, the charity founded by John Ruskin in 1871. He is also Emeritus Fellow in English at Sidney Sussex College Cambridge, an Honorary Fellow of Anglia Ruskin University, and an Honorary Patron of the William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow. In the first half of 2015 he was a Visiting Professor at Ca’ Foscari University, Venice. In 1985 he edited Unto this Last and Other Writings by John Ruskin for Penguin Classics and is the author of several books of poetry, including
New and Collected Poems (Carcanet, 2012).

The Doheny Library, University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles:
2 September 2015, 12 noon-1.30pm
Human Nature and Natural Abundance:
John Ruskin and the Environment

A lecture to USC by Clive Wilmer

ohn Ruskin (1819-1900) was a polymath: art critic, social critic, economist, naturalist, artist and philanthropist. He has even been credited with foreseeing climate change, which suggests something essential about his thought. He was a conservationist, in the built as well as the natural environment, and in 1871 he set up a utopian body, the Guild of St George, with the aim of restoring the link between art and craft, social wealth and natural abundance.


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